Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

Heart disease is common in people with diabetes. data from the national heart association from 2012 shows 65% of people with diabetes will die from some sort of heart disease or stroke. in general. The term “cardiovascular disease” is similar but includes all types of heart disease, stroke, and blood vessel disease. the most common type is coronary artery disease , which affects blood flow to the heart.. Adults with diabetes are 2 to 3 times as likely to die of heart disease or have a stroke as people who do not have diabetes. over time, high blood sugar from diabetes can damage blood vessels in the heart, and it can block blood vessels leading to the brain, causing a stroke..

Diabetes is treatable, but even when glucose levels are under control it greatly increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. that’s because people with diabetes, particularly type 2 diabetes, may have the following conditions that contribute to their risk for developing cvd. high blood pressure (hypertension) high blood pressure is a major. To help you better manage your diabetes and heart health, your doctor may prescribe medication. a solid medication regimen, in combination with a healthy diet and exercise, can help reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke. learn more. When you have diabetes, you’re more at risk of heart disease. this is also called cardiovascular disease (cvd) or coronary disease, and can lead to heart attacks and strokes. cardiovascular disease affects your circulation too. and poor circulation makes other diabetes complications worse – like problems with your eyes and feet..

Cardiovascular disease (cvd) people with diabetes are twice as likely to have heart disease or a stroke than people without diabetes. learn how to stay heart healthy to reduce your risk. read more. high blood pressure. high blood pressure—also called hypertension—raises your risk for heart attack, stroke, eye problems and kidney disease. Heart disease is the no. 1 killer for all americans, and stroke is also a leading cause of death. as frightening as those statistics are the risks of getting those diseases are even higher for african-americans. the good news is, african-americans can improve their odds of preventing and beating these diseases by understanding the risks and taking simple steps to address them.. Having diabetes raises your risk for stroke. but your risk is even greater if: you’re over age 55; your family background is african american; you’ve already had a stroke or a transient ischemic (ih-skee-mik) attack (also called a tia or a mini-stroke) you have a family history of stroke or tias; you have heart disease; you have high blood.

Heart disease is the no. 1 killer for all americans, and stroke is also a leading cause of death. as frightening as those statistics are the risks of getting those diseases are even higher for african-americans. the good news is, african-americans can improve their odds of preventing and beating these diseases by understanding the risks and taking simple steps to address them.. The term “cardiovascular disease” is similar but includes all types of heart disease, stroke, and blood vessel disease. the most common type is coronary artery disease , which affects blood flow to the heart.. When you have diabetes, you’re more at risk of heart disease. this is also called cardiovascular disease (cvd) or coronary disease, and can lead to heart attacks and strokes. cardiovascular disease affects your circulation too. and poor circulation makes other diabetes complications worse – like problems with your eyes and feet..