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Normal saline (10 ml/kg) is given over 1 h for initial volume expansion; thereafter, the child is rehydrated over 48 h at an even rate at two times the maintenance rate of fluid requirement. potassium phosphate: 4.4 meq potassium and 3 mmol phosphate (1 meq potassium and 0.68 mmol phosphate).. The total amount of potassium in the adult body is about 45 millimole (mmol)/kg body weight (about 140 g for a 175 pound adult; 1 mmol = 1 milliequivalent [meq] or 39.1 mg potassium) . most potassium resides intracellularly, and a small amount is in extracellular fluid [ 2-4 ].. Calculate concomitant amount of sodium that will be administered: each 1 mmol of phosphate contains ~1.3 meq of sodium; if amount of sodium to be delivered is a concern (ie, sodium serum level >145 meq/l), consider use of potassium phosphates iv to replete phosphorous level..

Plasma potassium is normally kept at 3.5 to 5.5 millimoles (mmol) [or milliequivalents (meq)] per liter by multiple mechanisms. since only 1–10 g of sodium and 1–4 g of potassium are likely to be replaced by diet, renal filtering must efficiently reabsorb the remainder from the plasma.. Hyponatremia is a low sodium concentration in the blood. it is generally defined as a sodium concentration of less than 135 mmol/l (135 meq/l), with severe hyponatremia being below 120 meq/l. symptoms can be absent, mild or severe. mild symptoms include a decreased ability to think, headaches, nausea, and poor balance. severe symptoms include confusion, seizures, and coma.. Care must be taken to avoid volume depletion. potassium and magnesium are monitored as often as every 4 hours during treatment and replaced iv as needed to avoid hypokalemia hypokalemia hypokalemia is serum potassium concentration 3.5 meq/l ( 3.5 mmol/l) caused by a deficit in total body potassium stores or abnormal movement of potassium into.

Normal potassium levels are between 3.5 and 5.0 mmol/l (3.5 and 5.0 meq/l) with levels below 3.5 mmol/l defined as hypokalemia. it is classified as severe when levels are less than 2.5 mmol/l. low levels may also be suspected based on an electrocardiogram (ecg). hyperkalemia is a high level of potassium in the blood serum.. Calculate concomitant amount of potassium that will be administered: each 1 mmol of phosphate contains ~1.5 meq of potassium; if amount of potassium to be delivered is a concern (ie, potassium serum level >4.0 meq/l), consider use of sodium phosphates iv to replete phosphorous level. Citrate in urine binds calcium so calcium cannot bind with phosphate or oxalate to produce stones. in the gi tract, let us say we have 800 mg of calcium in the diet = 20 mmol or 40 meq. i suppose if you took 20 meq of potassium citrate with a meal, and the meal were 1/3 or so of that calcium – 12 – 14 meq – it might affect absorption..

Calculate concomitant amount of potassium that will be administered: each 1 mmol of phosphate contains ~1.5 meq of potassium; if amount of potassium to be delivered is a concern (ie, potassium serum level >4.0 meq/l), consider use of sodium phosphates iv to replete phosphorous level. Hyponatremia is a low sodium concentration in the blood. it is generally defined as a sodium concentration of less than 135 mmol/l (135 meq/l), with severe hyponatremia being below 120 meq/l. symptoms can be absent, mild or severe. mild symptoms include a decreased ability to think, headaches, nausea, and poor balance. severe symptoms include confusion, seizures, and coma.. Calculate concomitant amount of sodium that will be administered: each 1 mmol of phosphate contains ~1.3 meq of sodium; if amount of sodium to be delivered is a concern (ie, sodium serum level >145 meq/l), consider use of potassium phosphates iv to replete phosphorous level..